20
Mar

Should Staffing within University Career Centre’s be tied to employment success rate of students upon graduation?

I just read the recent article in CBC news “It’s not a guarantee: University no longer comes with promise of stable job” by Nick Purdon and Leonardo Palleja

http://www.cbc.ca/news/business/millennial-jobs-education-1.4009295

and firmly believe that Universities and Post Secondary Career Centre’s in Canadian schools need to read this article and take note of it. According to Purden and Palleja’ s article, the University of Regina Graduate U appears to be ahead of the curve in responding the changing needs and might be a good program to adopt or use as a model.

As time goes on the emphasis will be for Career Centre’s to focus on the success rate of students becoming employed in “quality jobs” after graduation and not just minimum wage positions. I think Career Centre’s should have targets of placement and staff be tied to the success rate.  Students and parents will be looking at schools who provide this service as the cost of post secondary school tuition rises. It use to be having a university degree made it easier to get a job but that is no longer the case. While Co-op is a great option universities need to continue to help those who did not do a Coop or have not worked while going to school.

Career Centre’s need to be an integral part of the university experience and not a last minute thought.

In some universities a hands off approach is taken by the Career Centre staff, who believe that their job is “not to help students find a job, but it is to give them the tools to find it themselves. If we do their resumes they won’t know how to do them in the future for the next job.

While this sounds great the reality is that some career centres are not up to date.  To be successful the Career Centre’s will need to be labour market experts, understand the latest jobs, know where alumni are working and understand the career transition model and be the bridge to work. Students need some direction and knowledge with which to base decisions.  Learning how to do a great resume does not mean that you will be a great worker in your industry.

Career Centres exist because students need help, they are your customers.  I believe every student should be connected with an employer regardless of whether they are the top student or not. Sometimes the ones who academically not the best students make excellent workers in the right position. I am strong believer that all Career Advisors need to be constantly upgrading –you advocate this for students and why do you not do it yourself? Career Centre’s need to step up to the plate and be proactive and meet the changing needs of the student population.

 

6
Jul

Are you thinking about moving to Canada?

Not sure where to start when looking for work?

Make your relocation process less stressful by doing some of the leg work before you board the flight: ensure that you have a strong Canadian style resume; develop an updated LinkedIn profile that positions you as a desirable industry professional; and, most importantly, know where to go to network, and look for jobs, when you arrive. FutureWorks can help you with the transition in finding work.

As a country that annually wins multiple spots in the ‘Top Ten Cities in the World’ to live in, it is not surprising that Canada is the 3rd most popular destination for UK citizens looking to build a new life in another part of the world. The UK and Canada has many similarities that make it an appealing place to relocate to, but securing a job that utilizes your expertise and experience can prove to be a source of stress for many new immigrants. It is not always as quick as you hope it would be.

Job search in Canada is different. In Canada, your CV is a concise resume that uses short, tailored statements that sell your relevant skills and accomplishments to a specific employer. But it is not just a resume that you need. It is estimated that approximately 80% of jobs are ‘hidden’, and only accessible to people who network effectively with other industry professionals. This value placed on word of mouth referrals, can often be the roadblock for new immigrants who have yet to develop their Canadian network.

When looking for a career in Canada, you will often hear the term “Canadian experience”. Many new immigrants can too easily discouraged that they will not find a job as they do not have any Canadian work experience; something that organizations in Canada appear to value highly. However, before you become disheartened, you need to understand what Canadian experience actually is. Employers want to know that they are hiring someone who can ‘fit in’ with their work culture; they want to know that you have the communication style and interpersonal skills to work effectively with the rest of their team.

At FutureWorks we understand the challenges of emigrating from the UK to Canada as one of our Resume Writers Eilidh Sligo emigrated to Vancouver from the UK in 2012. Eilidh has collated some of the most valuable advice for others who are looking to do the same. Access these tips here.

Want help? For further information about how FutureWorks can help you in your Canadian job search, please email dorothyk@fwt.bc.ca  or call 604-618-3112.

6
Jul

Searching for Jobs in Canada

From her personal experience, and successfully helping other new immigrants, here are some of her most valuable tips for people considering making the same move.

  1. Determine the Best City for your Industry

    Just like the UK, different cities and provinces in Canada are home to different industries. Before you make your decision as to which city to move to, do some research to find out which location would provide you with the most opportunities within your industry. The Government of Canada provides industry statistics at www.ic.gc.ca/eic/site/cis-sic.nsf/eng/home.

  2.  Check if you are Qualified to Work in Canada

    For certain professions – for example physicians, nurses and lawyers – you will need to have your academic and/or professional credentials assessed before you are allowed to workin your field and may have to take further training. This takes time and varies by province and territory.  Visit www.servicecanada.gc.ca/eng/lifeevents/credentials.shtml.

  3. Swap your CV for a Canadian Résumé

    In Canada, your CV needs to be adapted to the more concise style of a résumé. Canadian resumes are typically no more than 2 pages in length (with the exception of C-Suite executives) and use concise, targeted statements to showcase your skills and accomplishments to a specific employer. Check out our Sample Portfolios at http://www.fwt.bc.ca/portfolio/ to see this style.

  4. Use Canadian English

    If you are moving to a non-French speaking part of Canada, make sure that you use Canadian English when writing your resume, cover letter and any email communication to potential employers. Switch your spell-check to ‘English (Canada)’ and learn, through practice, the different words that are used.

  5. Explain Any UK Specific Information on your Résumé

    Remember that information that might be immediately recognizable in the UK, might need some explanation in your resume for Canada. For young professionals, you might think that all Canadian employers will know what ‘2.1’ means after your degree. However, Canadian universities do not award classifications, instead using a GPA system. Similarly, it can be helpful to include a short description of the previous organizations that you have worked for (e.g. the industry and size of the organization).

  6. Use a Canadian Address

    If you are applying for positions before you leave the UK, you will need to let an employer know that you can work in Canada. If you don’t yet have a Canadian address, consider adding “Relocating to Vancouver, BC” next to your current address. You should explain in your cover letter when you are moving and confirm that you are legally allowed to work in Canada. Without this, there is a high risk that your résumé will go straight into the ‘no’ pile.

  7. Join Local Professional Associations

    A great way to network is to join the local chapter of your industry association. In addition to meeting fellow industry professionals and learning about the local industry, you can include your membership on your resume to show that you are determined to become familiar with how things work in Canada. A directory of Canadian associations can be found at www.ic.gc.ca/eic/site/ccc_bt-rec_ec.nsf/eng/h_00001.html.

  8. Network, Network, Network

    Approximately 80% of jobs in Canada are hidden. They are not advertised, but are instead filled through word of mouth referrals. Once you arrive in Canada, you will need to network to increase your chances of securing a job that matches your qualifications, experience and expertise. Get out and meet as many people as possible and, without directly asking for a job, let them know what you do. Informational Interviews are a useful, and perfectly normal, part of a Canadian job search. Do your best to source people who already work in your industry and might be willing to meet you for a chat about your profession.

  9. Consider Taking Some Additional Training

    Even if you are qualified, with plenty of good industry experience, it might take longer than you hope to find a suitable position. Consider using this time to complete some short courses to sharpen your current expertise or learn a new, industry relevant, skill. Completing this at a Canadian institution will be a useful addition to your resume by proving to potential employers that you want to learn the Canadian way of doing things – it’s also another way to network!

  10. Adapt to Canadian Work Culture

    Once you secure a role, the organizational culture that you are working in will vary depending on the city and province you live in, your industry, and the organization that you work for. When you start working, observe how others interact with each other and mimic this behaviour. Treat everyone with respect, offer supportive advice, and be aware that Canadians typically communicate indirectly. Promotional decisions in Canada are often influenced by how you work with your colleagues, not just your performance; taking the time to ‘fit in’ is genuinely worth the effort.

Good luck with your move to Canada!  If you would like some additional support from our professional resume writers, who can also help you to understand what it takes to succeed in a Canadian style job search, please contact us at dorothyk@fwt.bc.ca.

26
Apr

How to Successfully work with Recruiters from Head Hunting firms

You have decided that you want to reach out to a recruiter and gain their assistance in your job search. You have contacted several of them, but none of them have responded and you can’t understand why. I have had several of my clients get jobs through recruiters, so thought that I would share how to work with a recruiter and gain their attention in a good way! In order to do this you must first understand how a recruiter works, who they work with and how they get paid.  Below are few highlights that will be helpful for a jobseeker.

Do you have unique skills? First off, recruiters do not recruit for easy to fill positions, there are hundreds of suitable candidates that can be easily found. For example, if you have an MBA and no experience it is unlikely that a recruiter will be searching you out to promote you to an employer. If you have just completed your MBA and have ten years of experience in a field that is in high demand, then you could be of interest to the recruiter. Understand what your unique skills are and how these  make you marketable.

Recruiters are Specialists. Most retained executive search consultants have very specific niches. They know lots about the industries, job functions, and employers in their space… and probably not much about other industries. So when reaching out to recruiters, do you homework and find out what types of positions they recruit for and make sure your interests and skills fit with these. If you approach a recruiter who recruits for IT, and you are looking for a Business Development role, they will probably not respond to you.

They Are Interested in Hearing From You … provided you are in the area they recruit for! That doesn’t mean that they’ll take every call and respond instantly to every email, because …

Their Priorities are Different From Yours. You want a job…they have jobs…perfect match, right? Not necessarily! Recruiters work for (and are therefore loyal to) their clients, the hiring companies. They have no vested interest in any particular candidate.

They Are Not Sitting Around Waiting for Candidates to Contact Them. A key part of their job is scouring all of their vast resources and contacts to find potential candidates for specific opportunities.

Can They Find You? If you’re not visible in your industry, not easily found online, don’t work for a prominent company, or don’t have a decent network, recruiters may never find you. Start by posting a well-written, keyword-rich, accomplishment-loaded profile to LinkedIn – a favorite resource for recruiters!

Establish Interest Before Sending Your Résumé. A quick phone call or email to determine if there’s a common interest is a great way to launch a relationship with a recruiter in your space. Then, assuming mutual interest, forward your resume.
Get to the point in Your Resume. The first half page of a resume should provide the recruiter with the key skills you have to offer and the rest of the resume should back it up. Make sure your resume is sharply focused, easy-to-skim and easy-to-read. It must error free and well laid out.

Be Polite. Never launch into your “elevator pitch” without first determining that the recruiter has a few minutes to chat. Ask questions, don’t just spew out information. Listen to learn what is important to that recruiter, given current searches and anticipated needs.

Understand that the Right Fit is Paramount. Recruiters don’t match “a” candidate to a job; they recommend “the” best candidate given everything they know about the job, its challenges and opportunities, the company and its culture, and you – from their very careful interview and vetting process.

Be Transparent. Recruiters need to know it all – your compensation expectations, your reasons for leaving a job, your strongest interests, your ability to relocate and travel, and much more as they strive for that great fit. If you are less than honest and less than forthcoming, you’ll lose that recruiter’s trust and never be considered again.
Don’t Take It Personally If You’re Not Chosen. You’ll never know everything that’s behind any particular search or client situation. Recognize that the recruiter is doing his or her best job for that particular client.

Stay Connected. As mentioned, recruiters specialize! Stay on their radar screen and you may be contacted for other opportunities – now or in the future.  Most importantly, understand that recruiters are just one channel in an executive’s targeted search strategy. They can be extremely valuable during your search and throughout your career, but they are never the only avenue you should pursue when looking for work. You must recognize their needs and priorities to build a positive relationship and create a happy matchmaking environment.

About Dorothy Keenan of FutureWorks

Dorothy is a certified résumé writer with 25 years of experience in providing career advice and support to 5,000 professionals in diverse industries including technology, science, gaming, trades, finance, manufacturing, warehouse, and administration to find fulfilling careers. Through her work she has gained a solid understanding of the needs of British Columbia’s dynamic labour force. Her expertise in developing résumés, LinkedIn profiles, and cover letters  has helped her clients move forward in their careers. For more information visit www.fwt.bc.ca or contact dorothyk@fwt.bc.ca

12
Apr

The Truth on How Résumés Get Eliminated

Have you sent out hundreds of résumés and received NO response? Are you getting frustrated? Why are you getting eliminated? In this blog I am going to explain the harsh reality of what happens when you apply, and provide some tips on how to help your résumés to be viewed and land you an interview.

When a job-seeker is being considered for an open opportunity, the first person who will read their résumé is generally either a recruiter or an HR person. If it’s a recruiter, it could be either a 3rd-party, agency-based head-hunter type, or an internal, company-based corporate recruiter. If it’s someone in HR, it could be anyone from an entry-level screener to a Director of HR.

This screening and elimination process happens when you respond to online job postings, and  during proactive searches for candidates done on résumé banks like CareerBuilder, Monster, etc., or on Social Networks like LinkedIn. Basically, anyone who is looking for, and screening potential candidates, for an open job opportunity goes through this process.

While some people do make it through the online submissions, it is few and far between. That’s why you must not just rely on submitting the resume on line but also seek individuals within the firm who can alert the hiring person about a potential good candidate. The number of résumés that a recruiter reviews makes it challenging to stand out. Most résumés and online applications go into the proverbial “Black Hole of HR.”

Now I’m sure that you slaved over your résumé for hours and hours, writing and re-writing it, revising, refining and retooling its language until it’s as “perfect” as it can be. If you are like most serious job-seekers, you are hoping that the person who first screens your masterpiece will take their time and read it over very carefully – absorbing every detail of your background, analyzing your qualifications and experience, and making a carefully considered, informed decision about your fit for the position they are trying to fill. Unfortunately, you would be wrong. The reality is the average time a résumé-reader will give your résumé is 7 seconds on the first pass. They’ll scan the first page of your résumé, rarely progressing on to the second or third pages. If they don’t quickly see exactly what they think they want or need right up front –you are eliminated.

In my many years of hiring I have read my share of résumés. There were times when I went through over a hundred a day. I certainly know how this elimination game works! So, what follows is a peek behind the curtain of how it works. Employers want someone who can solve their pain and fill a spot, they really don’t care what they can do for you – it is what can you do for them. They have a business to run and need to make sure they get the best candidate to fill the opening.

Deal killers that will get you eliminated before you even get through the door.

Typos, Spelling or Grammatical Errors, Poor Writing – If you are so careless that you can’t even proofread your own résumé, then the assumption is that you would be equally careless with your job performance.

An unfocused résumé – Simply put, make sure the first top half of the first page clearly states: what you are looking for; what you have to offer; and why the company should hire you. Get to the point. The rest of the résumé should back up your profile. I have seen a résumé where an individual was wanting to be hired as a project manager and his last job was as a developer. He was very frustrated as no one looked at him for a project manager job. When he changed his resume and identified that he wanted a project management position on the first half of the resume,  in addition to stating that he had ten years of experience as a developer and an MBA in technology, he began to get interviews as a Project Manager and was hired. Employers are not mind readers, and need you to shape your resume so they understand what you want.

A poorly designed and incomplete profile on LinkedIn – More and more recruiters, and employers, are finding candidates by searching on LinkedIn. LinkedIn is not Facebook and that means you need to put your best professional foot forward. This starts with your picture – it must be professional. I had a young lawyer who was applying for an articling position and had a picture of herself sitting on a couch with a glass of wine in her hand. Would you want this person representing your firm? You want to show the employer that you can represent the company and be taken seriously. Make sure your profile is filled out and is not an exact replica of your resume-it is supposed to be a teaser to get the employer to contact you for more information. A number of my clients have been found on LinkedIn based on their profile.

No keywords in your résumé –. To speed up the process in searches – keyword searches are usually the first method used to find résumés with specific skills that match job descriptions. If the right words or phrases are not present in your résumé or profile, you simply won’t come up in a search done by a recruiter or an HR person. Recruiters do not have the time to “read between the lines” on your résumé and realize that you have the skills they need. No one will understand the subtle details of your experience without you clearly stating them. You should modify and tailor your résumé to each individual job you are applying to, using the language contained in the job description. If your résumé does not contain the exact buzzwords or phrases that match the language of the requirements listed in the job description, it is harder to get past the screening tools – be it a person or an online applicant tracking system (ATS).

Location – With very few exceptions, employers prefer candidates that live in the same geographic area as the job. You may say you are willing to relocate…but if an employer has a person with similar skills to you who lives locally, you may not make the cut into the interview pile.

Industry – In most cases, employers prefer to hire individuals who already know the industry. For example, if the job is in the Financial Services industry and you come from manufacturing, it will be a challenge to be considered. However with the right résumé and presenting some of the ransferrable skills you offer it is possible to be considered.

Function – Moving from one job function to another, that you’ve had little or no experience with, is an uphill battle. For example, if they are looking for someone with a sales background, but you have never actually been in a sales role  you will need to write a compelling profile that explains why you fit.

Level – If they are looking for an individual contributor, and you’ve been at a much higher level – say managing other people or a department… it’s not a match. Conversely, if they are looking for a Manager or a VP or a C-Level Executive, and you’ve never held those titles, it is a challenge.

Number of Years of Experience – and How Recent If the job description calls for someone with 3-5 years of experience, and you’ve had 10-15 years… it’s not a match. Similarly, if the  required experience is actually listed on your résumé–but it occurred many years and several jobs ago, and you’ve done other unrelated things since–it will be a barrier.

Education – Some companies require a college degree, or a specific type of certification. If they say you must have a B.A. and all you’ve got is an Associate’s Degree–or no degree at all–it may get you eliminated unless your experience is so strong that it overshadows the lack of degree. In this case, it might make sense to put your experience first and the education last. I worked with a Regional Sales Manager that had no formal sales education and had not completed a university degree in Geography. He had multiple offers despite this as he placed his experience first

Job Turnover – If your job history shows too many short stints over a limited time period, it can read as a negative: you might be a job-hopping flight risk.  You seemingly can’t hold down a job…perhaps you don’t get along with others well… there may have been performance issues that got you fired–the imagination creates all kinds of possible scenarios! Likewise, significant unexplained gaps between jobs can be red flags that will get you eliminated. There may be perfectly valid reasons for having a lot of jobs within a short period (mass layoffs, position was eliminated, company went out of business, etc.). I would advise briefly listing the reasons for short job stints right next to the dates on your résumé to avoid this obvious red flag.

Layout of résumé – As anyone in marketing can tell you–the way information is presented can make one product be chosen over another despite the products being very similar. Wether we like it or not a résumé is one piece in the jobseekers marketing campaign to get noticed by an employer and if your resumeis easy to read, and visually pleasing this will help yo to get into the “yes pile” for an interview.

It is important to take these into consideration when applying and not be discouraged. It is often for these reasons why individuals will seek the help of a professional résumé writer as they have the experience in helping clients overcome and position themselves in the best possible light.

About Dorothy Keenan of FutureWorks

Dorothy is a certified résumé writer with 25 years of experience in providing career advice and support to 5,000 professionals in diverse industries including technology, science, gaming, trades, finance, manufacturing, warehouse, and administration to find fulfilling careers. Through her work she has gained a solid understanding of the needs of British Columbia’s dynamic labour force. Her expertise in developing résumés, LinkedIn profiles, and cover letters has helped her clients move forward in their careers. For more information visit www.fwt.bc.ca or contact dorothyk@fwt.bc.ca

29
Mar

What Questions Should You Ask of a Recruiter Who Calls You About a Job?

For some of you a recruiter will connect with you on LinkedIn, or by email or phone. While it can be flattering, you need to ask questions so you understand the process and how that individual recruiter works. As a reminder, recruiters are paid for by the employer and you are their “product”. The recruiter needs to understand what skills you have to offer. If a recruiter contacts you at a time when you are NOT looking for work, perhaps you have just started a new role or it is simply not a good time, always be respectful to the recruiter. I have had some clients who were contacted again, months later, with an ideal position and they have been hired. Recruiters do keep files of good candidates and will go to the database to search when new positions come up. If you have been rude to the recruiter they will not put your forward.

Here are some questions to ask the recruiter so you understand the process and who they are recruiting for.

What company are they recruiting for?

Note: If you’ve already applied directly to that same company, the recruiter would usually not be able to represent you there.

Find out everything the recruiter knows about the company. If they cannot tell you the name of the company, ask why. It may be that the person currently in the role is in the process of being let go, or that they have not yet informed the people they needed the position internally. Be aware that, sometimes, the recruiter may not tell you who the firm is when they initially talk to you as they are first trying to establish a relationship with you.

However, sometimes recruiters are looking for candidates that they can promote to an employer to generate new business and you are the “hook”. They could have a long standing relationship with the company and know that you have the skills that this organization requires. This can be a great opportunity for you as you are not competing with anyone for the position; it is a direct match!

What are the job requirements?

Ask them to send you a job description. Help the recruiter see how you fit those requirements, if you do. Be honest about any requirements that you really don’t have.

What is the salary range defined for the position?

You should be honest and up front about your own salary history and the salary range you would accept going forward. If your salary history and expectations do not match the job’s defined range (or seem unrealistic) most recruiters will not consider it a match worth pursuing. Like it or not, it’s a primary factor that recruiters use to decide who they’ll represent to their clients. It is important that you understand your net worth in the industry.

What is the history of this position?

Is this a new position or replacement … and if the latter, what happened to the person who left?

Who is the hiring manager, and how well does the recruiter know that person?

What is their management style? What is the company culture like? Can you get any inside intelligence?

How many other candidates is this recruiter representing to this job?

Are there other agencies that are also sending candidates, or is this an “exclusive? “The reality is that often a recruiter is representing more than one candidate. The recruiter could be referring a few candidates to the employer and, in the end, the employer makes the final decision as to who is moving forward to the interview stage and is ultimately hired.

What is the client’s hiring timetable?

Find out what steps there are. How many phone interviews and in-person interviews will there be, and with whom? When do they want someone to start? How long has this position been open? How high is their degree of “urgency” to full it? Asking these questions can ease some of your anxiety as to what is happening as sometimes the hiring process can take months (if it was easy to hire they would not need a recruiter).

What is the next step?

Will the recruiter definitely be sending your information to the client – and if so, when? How soon should you expect to hear back from the recruiter? Good recruiters should be able to answer almost all of these questions and more. Recruiters will not rewrite your resume but may give you some suggestions on what needs to be highlighted in the resume. It is your job to make these adjustments or to find a professional resume writer to assist you.

The recruiter will help you prep and coach you

They will offer advice on how to successfully interview, using their insider knowledge of the company and the decision-makers, and they will help you negotiate the best salary if and when an offer comes. Good recruiters will also follow through with things that they say they will do, and will keep you informed with updates and progress reports. Expect good communication…and beware of anyone who suddenly stops returning your calls or emails — that’s a telltale sign of unprofessionalism that is certainly not limited to recruiters!

Verify that the recruiter will never submit your résumé to any companies or jobs without your knowledge and approval.

Believe it or not, this happens quite frequently. Some recruiters will send your résumé to companies without your permission and, if you are working with more than one recruiter, it can cause problems and can ruin your chances of getting the job – most companies will automatically eliminate any candidate who is submitted from multiple sources. They don’t want to get into the middle of a turf war.

This is a summary of questions to consider when working with a recruiter, but remember that a recruiter is only one source of looking for work. Don’t assume that by submitting your resume to a recruiter you are going to get a job.  The other ways are networking, responding to ads, and using social media sites such as LinkedIn, and Twitter. You are in charge of your own destiny.

About Dorothy Keenan of FutureWorks

Dorothy is a certified résumé writer with 25 years of experience in providing career advice and support to 5,000 professionals in diverse industries including technology, science, gaming, trades, finance, manufacturing, warehouse, and administration to find fulfilling careers. Through her work she has gained a solid understanding of the needs of British Columbia’s dynamic labour force. Her expertise in developing résumés, LinkedIn profiles, and cover letters  has helped her clients move forward in their careers. Contact www.fwt.bc.ca or dorothyk@fwt.bc.ca

22
Mar

What NOT To Do When Working With Recruiters

Here is some information you should know before commencing to work with a recruiter.

  • Never ever agree to pay any money to a recruiting agency for their services, or agree to any future financial obligations – e.g. re-paying their fees if you leave a job before their guarantee period is up. Recruiters are paid for their services by the company hiring and, in Canada, cannot ask a candidate for money to secure them a job. If a recruiter asks you for money to refer them to employers, do not use them.
  • Never do an “end-run” around a recruiter and apply directly to a job they told you about. That is extremely unethical, and almost never ends well. If, on the other hand, the recruiter does not submit you to their client company for whatever reason – then you have every right to go ahead and apply directly to that company on your own.
  • Do not sign any documents that promise “exclusive representation” by a recruiter. You have every right to work with multiple recruiters (as long as they are not working on the same job with the same company) and to continue applying directly to other companies. You should, however, inform your recruiter of other opportunities you are working on – especially if you are actually interviewing elsewhere, and may be getting close to an offer at another company.
  • Never lie to a recruiter about your qualifications, your experiences, your education, your salary history, or anything else! Be honest about everything, and expect the same in return. It can backfire on you if you lie.
  • Finally, do not put all of your job hopes into working with any recruiter, no matter how good they are. The real truth about working with recruiters is that while they can be a great resource, the vast majority of job-seekers today will NOT find their next job through a recruiter. Job-seekers should concentrate on their own networking activities designed to get them in front of decision-makers in their target companies. A recruiter is only one source of looking for work and you should continue to explore the other methods.

About Dorothy Keenan of FutureWorks

Dorothy is a certified résumé writer with 25 years of experience in providing career advice and support to 5,000 professionals in diverse industries including technology, science, gaming, trades, finance, manufacturing, warehouse, and administration to find fulfilling careers. Through her work she has gained a solid understanding of the needs of British Columbia’s dynamic labour force. Her expertise in developing résumés, LinkedIn profiles, and cover letters has helped her clients move forward in their careers. Visit www.fwt.bc.ca or contact dorothyk@fwt.bc.ca

15
Mar

Five Types of Recruiter

As a job seeker it is important for you to understand the different types of recruiters so that you are prepared and understand the role they can play in your job search. It can be confusing and, in order to understand and work with them effectively, I have broken them down into the five different types. You may get a call from one that introduces themselves as a certain type of recruiter that you have never heard of and are confused “do they work for a certain company or are they independent or exactly where do they fit in?” Here is an overview, and layman language definitions, of the different types of recruiters you may encounter in your job search.

Internal, In-house or Corporate Recruiter

An Internal, In-house or Corporate recruiter is the most common type of recruiter that you will  encounter and they will most likely refer to themselves as just ‘Recruiters’.They are usually employees of the company they hire for, and source full-time employees for their company. They are paid a salary and benefits just like any other employee.

Examples: Recruiters at companies such as VanCity, Google, Amazon, Lush, BC Hydo hire full-time employees for their own firms.

Contingency Recruiter

A Contingency Recruiting Agency is an outsourced provider.  Their recruiters conduct full-time employee searches on a contingency (paid only if they find a successful candidate) basis for a client company. The recruiter is responsible for the initial recruiting, screening and interviewing, and arranging 2nd round interviews with the client company.

Companies use these kinds of recruiters if their in-house recruiters can’t keep up with an unexpectantly high hiring demand or they they don’t have a dedicated HR team to find prospective  employees. The client company pays either a flat fee or a percentage of the first year’s salary, usually 15-35% depending on the difficulty of sourcing suitable candidates. Job seekers do not have to pay a fee. Many staffing companies also offer contingency services. They typically advertise these jobs as ‘Direct Hire’ or ‘Contract to Hire’ to indicate they are different than the common contract positions.

Examples: Miles Employment Agency, Robert Half, Annex, PDF, Odgers Bernston, Locke & Associates

Retained Recruiter Staffing Agency Recruiter (Temp/Contract)

This is one of the more common type of recruiter you will encounter if you post your resume on a job board. A Temporary Agency (Temp Agency) hires temporary employees (contractors) to work for a short duration at a client company. The contractor works at the client site and under supervision from the client’s manager but is employed by the staffing agency and the staffing agency pays all wages, employer taxes, medical insurance and benefits. For all legal purposes the individual is an employee of the staffing company but their daily work is directed by the client where they work.

The client company pays an hourly rate for the contract/temp employee which includes the contractor’s pay and a markup for the staffing company to take care of the staffing company’s costs of sales, recruiting, HR and payroll and profit. In exchange, the client gets the benefit of hiring and terminating such ‘contingent’ resources much more easily and reduces their people costs by not having to pay for vacation or other benefits paid to its full-time employees.

Examples: Adecco, Aerotek, Miles Employment Group, Corporate Recruiter. These work for clients which include startups, small businesses to Fortune 500 companies

Consulting Company Recruiter

A number of Consulting companies follow a similar model to staffing companies but they typically provide higher skilled professionals such as software engineers, finance and marketing professionals. The smaller consulting companies operate more like staffing companies in that their employment contract is only valid until the project they are working on is ongoing.

Examples: Top-Tier Consulting companies like Accenture, Cap Gemini, and McKinsey differentiate themselves by not terminating employees when their consulting engagement is over. They either find them different projects or work on internal projects but continue to pay them even when these consultants are on the ‘bench’ (not billing a client, at least for a few months till they find them their next project).This justifies the higher hourly rates charged by these companies.

About Dorothy Keenan of FutureWorks 

Dorothy is a certified résumé writer with 25 years of experience in providing career advice and support to 5,000 professionals in diverse industries including technology, science, gaming, trades, finance, manufacturing, warehouse, and administration to find fulfilling careers. Through her work she has gained a solid understanding of the needs of British Columbia’s dynamic labour force. Her expertise in developing résumés, LinkedIn profiles, and cover letters has helped her clients move forward in their careers. Contact www.fwt.bc.ca or dorothyk@fwt.bc.ca

8
Mar

Networking for Introverts

Contrary to popular belief, introverts are not shy individuals who do not like people. Rather, the 52% of people who categorize themselves as introverts simply find many social interactions draining and need time to recharge after being around people. These people can find the job search norm of “getting out there and meeting people” at networking events particularly challenging. However, like it or not, networking events are a key component of a successful job search and being an introvert in no way means that you cannot be a skilled networker.

Here are some tips to get the most out of networking events, particularly for the introverts out there:

Do your research

Generally, introverts prefer to have time to think ideas through and organize their thoughts before speaking. While a networking event with continual introductions to new people might not immediately seem like the obvious place to be able to think things through, you can minimize your stress by researching prior to the event. Most networking events will have an online registration page, confirming the schedule for the evening, any guest speakers, and often even a list of those who will be attending. Take the time to review this information beforehand, familiarize yourself with other registrants and plan possible conversation topics.

Plan your agenda

What do you want to get from the event? Do you want to meet potential employers? Gather industry information? Or, source candidates for informational interviews? Either way, setting your agenda before the event will increase the likelihood of meeting your personal objectives.

Set some targets

If you find networking events draining, you may be tempted to leave after 20 minutes or speak to one person and then secure a lone position at the bar. If this sounds like you, set yourself some targets before the event. Decide the minimum amount of time that you can stay for and/or the minimum number of people that you can have a conversation with – you never know, you might even exceed these!

You are not alone

Approximately 80% of people feel uncomfortable at networking events. If this is you, you are not alone. If nerves get the better of you, it is too easy to convince yourself that: everyone there knows everyone else; no one would want to talk to you; or you cannot bring any value to the conversations. This is not true. Event attendees are all at the event for the same reason, to talk to people. Practice makes perfect – the more you network, the more comfortable you will become.

Choose carefully and don’t get stuck

Once you arrive at the event, who are you going to talk to? Look for other individuals who are standing alone (usually by the bar or the food table!) or chat with the event organizer(s) who will usually be happy to introduce you to another attendee. Another good place to position yourself is close to the registration table, as people arrive they will also be looking for someone to engage with.

It is important that you don’t only talk to one person at the event. If you are nervous, you may be happy to stay with that one person so that you don’t have to start over again. However, this is not the purpose of networking events and won’t help you meet your objectives. After a short conversation, thank them for their time – arranging to stay in touch if appropriate – and move onto another person.

Don’t only talk shop

While networking is an essential part of job search and career management, you should not only be talking about business. Be aware of current events and local, uncontroversial news so that you can make small talk. The weather is always a popular conversation starter, as are questions about the venue and whether they have been to the event before. Avoid conversations about politics or religion, and never put anyone on the spot by asking for a job.

Don’t overindulge

Many events will offer appetizers and alcoholic drinks. If you are nervous, don’t over indulge in the wine or beer for some “Dutch courage” – you don’t want to be remembered for the wrong reasons. Limit yourself to one or two social drinks or stick to the club soda. Similarly with any food, ensure that you don’t opt for any items which will be difficult to eat when having a conversation (e.g. anything with gravy/sauce) or will leave unsightly green bits in your teeth!

Smile!

You might be nervous, drained and/or ready to go home but make sure that you keep smiling!  Friendliness is incredibly influential to your likability, and ultimately, your employability.  If you are standing on your own, someone is much more likely to approach you and start a conversation if you are smiling genuinely and standing with open, welcoming body language.

Now work your magic!

As I said, being an introvert does not mean that you cannot be a skilled networker – you simply develop these working relationships in a different way. If you met someone interesting at the event, reach out to them and invite them for a coffee and follow-up conversation. This one-to-one networking is often where introverts thrive, able to strengthen relationships through in-depth and thoughtful conversation.

 

About Dorothy Keenan of FutureWorks

Dorothy is a certified résumé writer with 25 years of experience in providing career advice and support to 5,000 professionals in diverse industries including technology, science, gaming, trades, finance, manufacturing, warehouse, and administration to find fulfilling careers. Through her work she has gained a solid understanding of the needs of British Columbia’s dynamic labour force. Her expertise in developing résumés, LinkedIn profiles, and cover letters has helped her clients move forward in their careers. Contact www.fwt.bc.ca or dorothyk@fwt.bc.ca

20
Jan

What is the purpose of Informational Interviews and why do them?

Everyone talks about the hidden job market and how many jobs are not even advertised. So how do you find these hidden jobs? Where are these jobs? Having worked in the employment industry for over 25 years, and helped thousands of people find jobs, I wanted to share what I have learned with you.

So what is an Informational Interview?

You can find a jobs before it is advertised by doing informational interviews with companies that you are interested in working for. Knowledge is power!

Basically, an Informational Interview is a conversation. These are very important in your search for a new job and help in determining if the company is a good fit for you. Informational interviews help you get an inside glimpse into organizations that you would not gain from a job interview. Simply put, it is an interview where the goal is gathering information about a profession or organization rather than securing employment (although job offers can result from the meeting!). It is a fact-finding discussion where you talk with people already working in a particular role, field, industry, or work place about:

• the tasks that they perform and the knowledge and skills that they use

• the path that they took and the experience and qualifications required to obtain their job

• the kinds of people that they serve, lead, and/or with whom they collaborate on the job

• the sort of work environment and culture in which they work

• the joys and frustrations of doing their work, in their industry and for their organization

Your aim is to get an overview of both their typical workday as well as the variety of work situations, interactions and opportunities they have encountered across the course of their career.

You can gain information aboutthe important characteristics that the different companies look for when hiring. This will help you in creating cover letters, and resume that emphasize the key attributes that you have to offer. They are also a great way to practice your interview skills prior to a job interview.

How Informational Interviews have helped my clients find jobs

Many companies have a referral system and ask their staff if they know of anyone who they believe can be a good fit for the organization.Some even give a bonus to staff who refer individuals who are hired. However, it is important to remember that it is not a guarantee that an Informational Interview will result in the person referring you for an opening within a company.

One of my clients, who had and MBA and very little work experience as a Business Analyst, went for an Informational Interview with someone who was working at a large organization that she was very interested in working for. The two had worked together at a previous firm, and when they met for an Informational Interview the employee took her resume into the Hiring Manager and promoted her for an available position. The result was an interview, as she was recognized in the pile of 300 applicants, and ended up getting the job! This does not happen every time, but I have seen it happen enough times to know it works for many.

In another case, I had a client in the biotechnology field who was laid off in early November. Through doing a series of Informational Interviews, he landed a job in early January! He set-up an Informational Interview with someone who he had worked with ten years ago, who had recently secured funding for a new research project and was at the early stages of recruiting. Initially, the company had thought they were going to hire a junior person, but upon meeting my client who had twenty years of experience, they decided to redo the job description and hired him.  The Informational Interview enabled them to realize that his skills could move the research must faster and were critical to helping them grow.

Review your network to see if you know anyone who works at an organization that you would like to work for.  If not, use LinkedIn to find shared connections and ask your contacts for an introduction.

Companies Forecast Future Staffing Needs

Organizations will forecast their staffing needs and often have projects that are waiting for approval.  Usually, they will start to collect resumes and potential staff prior to these projects starting. During an Informational Interview, you can find out about their future needs and gain an understanding of what skills they require. This allows you to determine if you have a skills gap, and enable you to use the time prior to the forecasted position to gain the essential skills.

Consider Informational Interviews when searching for jobs or for identifying the best courses to take that will fit your interests and needs.

My next blog will provide tips on how to do an informational interview and what questions to ask.